Dorothy West
On Aug. 26, 1869, the Oak Bluffs Land and Wharf Company, an energetic corporation which had bought up acres of the lovely woods and meadows and shore front stretches of what is now Oak Bluffs, sold one of those lots, 69 Pequot avenue, to Lydia B. Smith of New Bedford.
The Cottagers
Dorothy West
Oak Bluffs town hall
Historic buildings
Noah Asimow
Homeowners Steve and Ellie Wise will withdraw their application to demolish a house at 189 Katama Road.
Martha's Vineyard Commission
Historic buildings

2014

Twelve years in the making, the complicated deal with the town, the land bank and the Howard B. Hillman family will create affordable housing, add conservation land and save a historic home in Chilmark.

Terry and Marcia Martinson began to move into an old house looking down on the Edgartown harbor this week. Unlike most people who live on the Island waterfront these days, the Martinsons will live there year-round. But taking the whole history of the place into account, their time in the home will be short.

With the much-discussed big-house bylaw now a fact of life in Chilmark, discussion at the town planning board this week turned to preservation of historic houses.

Pamela Goff, who owns a pre-Revolutionary house off Tea Lane, asked the board to consider an amendment to the bylaw approved by voters last year to regulate very large houses. The first-of-its-kind bylaw could have the unintended consequence of actually encouraging people to demolish old houses instead of preserving them, Mrs. Goff said.

An old house on South Water street in Edgartown changes hands. The previous owners had deep Vineyard roots and a sense of social justice ahead of its years. But the whale is not there anymore.
A complicated three-way land swap designed to create affordable housing, add conservation land and save a historic home is valid and enforceable, a superior court judge found.

2013

The history of Seven Gates Farm goes back to 1887, and for generations a parade of farmers, shareholders and conservationists have done just about all they could to keep the land and buildings of this enclave looking, working and feeling largely unchanged.

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