Lorenzo D. Jeffers Named Head of Gay Head Tribe
Vineyard Gazette
Lorenzo Jeffers, descendant of Mittark, the last Island Indian chief, was duly elected chief of his tribe at a meeting held at Gay Head last week. The occasion of this election of a chief was the organizing of the tribe in order to gain representation in the Wampanoag Council, in which all the southern New England tribes with their branches were represented at a kindling of the council brand at Mashpee a couple of weeks ago, the first time that the Wampanoags have assembled in tribal council for 200 years.
Read More

When Gay Head Was Still Just a District
Vineyard Gazette
A collection of old documents dating far back in the last century has been unearthed in the old Jeffers house at Gay Head by Lorenzo D. Jeffers, the present owner of the estate of his ancestors. These documents consist of letters, ledgers, bills and notations kept by Thomas Jeffers, grandfather of the present owner.
 
Read More

Review of the Week
Vineyard Gazette
The Gay Head Indians were visited last Friday by the Hon. Rodney French, chairman on the part of the House of Representatives of the Indian Committee. The chieftains of the tribe assembled in council at 10 o’clock of the day above named, and expressed their opinion on the proposed questions of enfranchisement, &c.
 
Mr. Zaccheus Howwaswee, expressed his opinion in favor of remaining in their present condition.
 
Read More

Is This Indian Name Doomed to Be Forgotten in Future?
Vineyard Gazette
In the ever-present condition of change among things and men, the name of Chappaquansett seems doomed to be forgotten, though once frequently heard the length and breadth of the Island. For few people mention today the Indian name of that curious, low area that lies between West Chop and Makonikey along the Sound shore.
 
True, the character of the place has greatly changed through the centuries and even through the past few generations. There are no more farms such as the early Vineyarders knew, and the encampments of Indians had disappeared long before that.
Read More

Blockade Runners Once Used This Historic Creek
The work of dredging now going on at Tashmoo Creek focuses attention upon one of the historical landmarks of the Island and one of which very little is remembered or preserved. Indians called this locality Chappaquansett, and old records refer to the creek as Chappaquansett Creek, rather than Tashmoo. It is evident that the Indians frequented this place in the olden days, as sizable middens have been located nearby and others are presumably buried beneath the shifting sands or have been washed out to sea.
Read More

Election of Edwin D. Vanderhoop
Vineyard Gazette

While the election of Mr. Vanderhoop last Tuesday was not unexpected, the size of the majority by which that result was secured was probably hardly anticipated even by his friends. The campaign for Mr. Vanderhoop developed into a regular craze as it progressed; he became a sort of Buffalo Bill-among-the-British-nobility. People began to glory in the notion of elevating a Gay Head Indian to in some respects the highest place in the gift of the county.

Read More

Epenow, Indian of Significance in Capawack History
Warner F. Gookin
“Yea, those of the Isles of Capawack sent to make friendship.” With these words, Governor Bradford, recording in his history, “Of Plimouth Planta­tion”, a moral triumph over the sur­rounding savages, singles out for men­tion by name the most dreaded tribe under Massasoit, Sachem of the Warmanoag, of southern Massachusetts.
 
Read More

Priscilla Freeman
Cottage City Star

Mrs. Priscilla Freeman, formerly of Deep Bottom but now of Cottage City, one of the few remaining having Indian blood coursing in her veins, if her story is correct – and we believe it is – is a wronged woman.

Read More

Legends Are Not Just History, They Continue to Speak Loudly
Womsikuk James

The following is an award-winning essay written by Womsikuk James for the Young Native Writer’s Essay Contest.

Read More

Aquinnah Tribe Hails Mashpee
Ian Fein

When the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe received a telephone call from U.S. Department of Interior last week, formally announcing their federal recognition as a sovereign Indian tribe, members of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) looked across to the Cape with a warm heart and a jaded eye.

They had lived through a similar moment almost 20 years ago to the day, when they celebrated their status as the first federally recognized tribe in the commonwealth.

Read More

Pages