Ivy Ashe

Last of Her Kind, Whaleship Charles W. Morgan Has Strong Ties to the Vineyard

Sara Brown

The Charles W. Morgan came back to life this spring.

The last American wooden whaling ship once again had saltwater under her 173-year-old keel. Ocean winds buffeted her new suit of sails. She has another captain and a new crew occupying bunks and climbing the rigging.

When the Charles W. Morgan first launched on a summer day in New Bedford in 1841, there was nothing particularly special about her. By all accounts she was a fine wooden ship, but just one of 2,700 ships that made... Read more...

On to New Bedford

June 25, 2014 - 9:47am

The gangplank was pulled away and the Charles W. Morgan, under tow, departed from Tisbury Wharf at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

The last wooden whaling ship was escorted by more than a dozen boats as she left Vineyard Haven harbor. The Island Home ferry was right behind her. Boat horns and cannons sounded, and onlookers lined the wharf from Eastville Beach to Tisbury Wharf to get a last...

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