Language of Assimilation

Although now in its second generation, the Brazilian community is still largely perceived as an island unto itself, isolated from the mainstream Vineyard community.

Ahead of the Curve: English Language Learner Program Thrives

There are 140 nonnative English speakers in the public schools across the Island, the highest count in recent memory. Most are second generation U.S. residents. Educators are responding by setting a standard for excellence in learning.

Bringing a Love of Language to Learning

The classroom is up the open staircase to the right in room 220 at the Edgartown School. Flags of world nations hang from the ceiling. There is a quote on the door that reads, “No significant learning occurs without a significant relationship.” This is the English Language Learning room, although it is not the only place in the school where English language learning takes place.

Chasing English as a Language Is the Objective

For four years now, since its inception in 1997, the state-sponsored special English language program has been growing. From three classes that first year to seven classes today - and it's still not enough. Ninety-seven adult students enrolled, and 154 filled the waiting list during September registration earlier this year. Another 86 added their names to the list several weeks ago, when a second registration was held - a mid-session adjustment to enroll students replacing those no longer in the course.

English as a Second Language: Growing Problem Taxes Programs

The waiting list for English as a second language classes on the Island has more than 80 names, and has left Island educators scrambling for teachers and funds.

Schools Failing Needs of Brazilian Students, U.S. Investigation Finds

A federal civil rights investigation of the Oak Bluffs and Tisbury schools has cited both for failing to meet the instructional needs of their growing population of Brazilian students.

The investigation was triggered by a parent complaint in November which alleged that the schools' lack of trained teachers, interpreters and appropriate materials was shortchanging Brazilian students.