Mermaids’ Muse Loose in House of Blues

What if your muse becomes your shrink? Margot Datz didn’t really take her paintings of mermaids seriously until they began to speak to her like a Ouija Board, predicting divorce, life changes and pointing out a woman’s place in the landlocked world.

Chappy Native Pens Kids’ Book, Talks About Growing Up Different

As a student at the Edgartown School, a counselor once told Chappaquiddick native Stephanie Duckworth-Elliott that she wouldn’t go to college, and implied that Ms. Duckworth-Elliott would not achieve in life. The young girl had a background and home life that already separated her from other kids her age — she was a member of the only Wampanoag family living on Chappy at the time, and raised primarily by her grandfather — and the counselor’s prediction made her feel even more detached from her peers.

Writer Muses on Sly Stone, Vineyard

Writer Ben Greenman so craves human contact as part of his routine that he edits the front section of The New Yorker.

His fiction, including his latest novel, Please Step Back, he boxes off in the mornings and evenings at his Brooklyn home, between raising his five and eight year-old sons. Then he takes the subway into Manhattan and begins to put together the listings and features that make up Goings On, the weekly events guide of the globally-renowned magazine. It’s a job he has held for 10 years.

ACE MV Teachers and Students Offer Free Reading

Teachers and students from Adult and Community Education of Martha’s Vineyard will share excerpts from their work with the public on Friday, November 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the high school library.

Imperialism in America: Activist Speaks

Author/activist David Swanson is coming to speak at the Tisbury Senior Center from 4 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 7.

Hosted by the Martha’s Vineyard Peace Council, Mr. Swanson will be introducing his latest book, Daybreak: Undoing the Imperial Presidency and Forming a More Perfect Union, released Sept. 1 by Seven Stories Press. Copies will be available at this event.

Author John Sundman Kickstarts New Project

It’s an age-old problem. An artist, writer, explorer or inventor has an idea for a project he feels confident will pay off in the long run, but no money to live while he completes it. Where does the artist turn for funds? And on the other side, how do patrons find new talents worthy of their support?

Reliving the Sixties

Reliving the Sixties

Vineyard author Tom Dresser will discuss his latest books, In My Life and It Was 40 Years Ago Today, Wednesday, November 4, at 5:30 p.m. at the Chilmark Public Library.

A coming-of-age novel set in a small New England town in the 1960s, In My Life resonates with an atmosphere familiar to many baby-boomers.

It Was 40 Years Ago Today is a nonfiction review of the Beatles, recently published to coincide with the anniversary of the release of the Beatles’ album Abbey Road.

Gonzo Sci-Fi Writer Creates The Pains in Tisbury

John Sundman is a Tisbury-based science fiction writer. He has recently self-published his third book, The Pains, a dark, satirical vision of 1984 America that blends George Orwell’s classic dystopia with a surreal version of the real-life Reagan-era. According to the author, it is a “story of faith in a world that appears to be falling apart. It tells the story of Norman Lux, a 24-year-old novitiate in a religious order, who becomes afflicted with something akin to stigmata.”

Spielberg Hooks Rights to Derby Book

The Vineyard may yet be the scene of another big fish film under the eye of Steven Spielberg: the Jaws director’s studio, DreamWorks, has just bought the film rights for a soon to be released book about the Martha’s Vineyard Striped Bass and Bluefish Derby.

The book, The Big One: An Island, an Obsession and the Furious Pursuit of a Great Fish, by David Kinney, published by Atlantic Monthly, will be released on April 8.

Author Roger Yepsen Will Serve Up Slow Food Storytelling on Tuesday

People who merely have heard about Slow Food — the “eco-gastronomic” movement aimed at counteracting the effects of fast food on American diet, farming and lifestyle — might associate it with the rarified, elite world of famous chefs, expensive foods and politically correct eating that tends to be too dear for regular folk.

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