Golf Day Honors Ken Williams, Who Began Polaroid Revolution

Caroline Hunter opens up a binder densely packed with years of newspaper clippings, decades-old photos, letters and other paper mementos. Beside her is a stack of books marked with dozens of blue Post-it notes. The meticulous bookkeeping is not a hobby. And though the man to whom these records pertain is Caroline’s late husband, Ken Williams, this scrapbook filled with Ken’s work, and articles and books mentioning him, is not a memorial: for Caroline, it is a civic responsibility.

Cue the Lights and Start the Seduction: Eisenhauer Gallery Opens Group Show

Cheri Christensen’s No Country for Old Cows sits on a wall in Eisenhauer Gallery in Edgartown. True to the name, it’s a painting of cattle. But the artist’s use of light, a faint yellow outline around her subjects, gives the cows an aura of majesty, as if rays of the setting sun chose only to fall on them.

All Island Art Show Turns 50, Opening Monday at Tabernacle

On a sunny August morning in 1990, a retired lawyer living on the Vineyard was setting up his presentation for that year’s All Island Art Show at the Tabernacle in Oak Bluffs.

“I’m getting back into the spirit of Martha’s Vineyard,” he told a Gazette reporter at the time. It was a comment the reporter said reflected the atmosphere of the day. And it’s a sentiment, according to Gazette records, that has marked the last half-century for the All Island Art Show, which opens for its 50th year Monday at the Tabernacle.

Art So Close Yet Still an Island Away

For a Vineyard kid, “when you first move away, there are two places: on-Island and off-Island,” said Kelley Callahan, viewing the exhibition by Marshall Pratt at the Periwinkle Gallery in Oak Bluffs which opened last weekend. In the show, A Vineyard Boy in Boston, Pratt uses photographs to depict this contrast, for instance by juxtaposing the image of a rock at Squibnocket and a similar rock in a Boston slum.

Island Inspires Artist Rose Abrahamson

Tonight, Rose Abrahamson will celebrate what she warns could be her last art opening. “I’ll be 87 in October,” she said by way of an invitation to come and preview her new paintings and collage work. “How much longer can I work?”

It’s a Bird, It’s a Photographer: Artist Launches Virtual Gallery

Lanny McDowell is having an opening this week that can take place in anyone’s home or office. He has opened a gallery on the Internet showing his fine art avian photographs. Anyone can go there by pressing a few buttons on the computer.

Most Vineyard artists have openings at galleries. They schedule a day in the height of summer to roll out their work, send out a box full of invitations and wait for the crowds to come. A reception usually includes wine and cheese and then after a week or so, the work comes down.

African Artists’ Project Will Benefit Orphanage

The African Artists’ Community Development project will be selling crafts from Ghana, Niger, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe on Tuesday, July 8, at the Grange Hall in West Tisbury from 5 to 9 p.m. Items for sale include baskets, woven grass ceremonial cloth, Tuareg silver jewelry, malachite jewelry, carved wooden bowls and salad servers, animal and human sculpture, brilliant khanga printed cloth and more.

Simonized: Photographer, Jewelry Maker Open a New Gallery in Vineyard Haven

Simon. A famous name in arts and literature. Consider Neil Simon, simple Simon, Paul Simon, Carly Simon, Simon le Bon of Duran Duran, or the late and unlamented Simon Legree of Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Midwinter Triple Play at Featherstone: Three Artists Converge in a Single Show

Each winter Featherstone Center for the Arts, the Vineyard’s only year-round art center, undergoes a rebirth.

While students register for art classes, the gallery is refurbished. This year a new track has been installed around the perimeter of the gallery to better display works of art. And the gallery floor has been sanded down to bare wood and sealed for a gleaming new surface.

By Design: A Painter Bounces Off Walls

Robert Jones had the daunting task of settling the estate of the renowned African-American artist Lois Mailou Jones after she died in 1998 at the age of 93. Imagine his amazement at rooting around in the basement of his cousin’s Washington, D.C. home and uncovering a cobweb-draped box that contained a collection of masterpiece textile designs Ms. Jones had created 75 years before.

Pages